DateAugust 16, 2013
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When your child is sick, you want to do whatever you can to make them better. In the case of dehydration, that means replenishing fluids. When the body is losing more fluids than usual because of diarrhea, vomiting, and/or a high fever, parents will need to ensure that a child is taking in enough fluids to make up the difference.

DateAugust 16, 2013
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When a child is sick, we’re told to keep them hydrated. However, not all drinks are created equal when it comes to keeping children healthy. In fact, some drinks could do more harm than good.

DateAugust 16, 2013
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Being dehydrated is more than just being thirsty. It occurs when a body is losing more water than it is able to replace. Over half of a body’s weight is made up of water. It’s necessary to keep each system running properly. When the body is dehydrated, it cannot function as it is supposed to. Find out more about how staying hydrated means staying healthy.

DateAugust 13, 2013
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How many times throughout the day do you or your children comment that you’re feeling thirsty? There are several reasons that we might make that statement. It could be actual thirst, just wanting a sip of water. Sometimes, especially with kids, it can be a comment made when feeling bored. However, feeling thirsty can also be the first sign of dehydration.

DateAugust 13, 2013
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We’ve all heard of drinks containing electrolytes that are supposed to be the perfect choice for replenishing fluids. Parents will notice them in drinks that promise to help soothe the aching stomachs of children. How much do you know about electrolytes and what they can do for your kids?

DateAugust 13, 2013
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A recent survey* of moms revealed the top 5 myths about how to spot and help prevent dehydration caused by diarrhea and vomiting.

MYTH: Any liquid can prevent and treat dehydration in children with diarrhea and vomiting.

MYTH: The best way to hydrate a child is to have them quickly drink as much fluid as possible.

MYTH: It’s O.K. to wait a while before giving liquids after a child has had diarrhea and vomiting.

MYTH: It takes several episodes of diarrhea with vomiting for an infant to become dehydrated.

MYTH: It’s easy for a mom to tell if her child is dehydrated.

To help correct these myths, Pedialyte has developed the Mom’s Stomach Flu Survival Guide, designed to give busy moms the insight they need to prepare for, help prevent, and help manage diarrhea and vomiting when these symptoms hit.

ATTENTION: Help prevent the flu and a troubled tummy by cleaning toys and door handles.